Ling-Temco-Vought TA-7C Corsair II

Last revised December 12, 2001


In 1972, Vought modified the first TF-41-powered A-7E (BuNo 156801) as a tandem, two-seat combat trainer demonstrator. A seat for a second crewman was added in tandem, both crew members sitting underneath a clamshell. The student sat in front, the instructor in the rear. In order to accommodate the second crewman, the aircraft had an extra 34-inch plug added to the fuselage forward of the wing. The instructor in the rear seat was raised somewhat higher that that of the pupil in front, giving the aircraft a distinctive hump-backed appearance. Despite the second seat, the aircraft retained full combat capability.

The two-seater flew for the first time on August 19, 1972, piloted by John Konrad. The aircraft was initially designated YA-7H, with the expectation that production two-seat Corsair IIs would be designated A-7H. However, in the meantime, the designation A-7H had been reserved for the Corsair II version built for Greece (the H standing for Hellenic), so the two-seater was redesignated YA-7E.

After demonstrating the two-seat Corsair II at various naval air stations, Vought was awarded a contract to modify 60 TF30-powered Corsair IIs (24 A-7Bs and 36 A-7Cs) into two-seat trainers, to be designated TA-7C. The first converted TA-7C flew for the the first time on December 17, 1976 and was delivered to the Navy on January 31, 1977. The TA-7Cs were delivered to VA-122 and to VA-174.

In 1982, eight TA-7Cs were modified as EA-7L electronic aggressor aircraft. These planes were equipped with the ability to carry jamming pods and missile simulators on underwing pylons to duplicate Soviet weapons and tactics during training. They were issued to VAQ-34, based at NAS Point Mugu, California in 1983

In 1984, Vought was issued a contract to upgrade 49 of the two-seaters (including the eight EA-7Ls) with the Allison TF41-A-402 engine to bring them up to the standards of the single-seat A-7E. The McDonnell Douglas Escapac ejection seats were replaced by Stencel ejector seats, and maneuvering flaps were added. The modified aircraft, however, retained their original TA-7C and EA-7L designations.

Serial Numbers of Ling-Temco-Vought TA-7C Corsair II

154361/154417	Ling-Temco-Vought A-7B-1-CV Corsair II
				154361 converted to TA-7C.  
				154377 converted to TA-7C.  
				154379 converted to TA-7C.
				154402 converted to TA-7C.  
				154404 converted to TA-7C.
				154407 converted to TA-7C.
				154410 converted to TA-7C.
				1545412 converted to TA-7C.
154418/154474	Ling-Temco-Vought A-7B-2-CV Corsair II
				154424 converted to TA-7C
				154425 converted to TA-7C.  
				155437 converted to TA-7C
				154450 converted to TA-7C.
				154455 converted to TA-7C.  
				154458 converted to TA-7C.  
				154464 converted to TA-7C.  
				154467 converted to TA-7C.  
				154469 converted to TA-7C.  
				154471 converted to TA-7C.  
154475/154522	Ling Temco-Vought A-7B-3-CV Corsair II
				154477 (c/n B-117) to AMARC as 6A0420 Oct 17, 1996.  Transferred to Greek AF.  I have this one
					as having been converted to TA-7C.
				154489 converted to TA-7C.  
				154500 converted to TA-7C.
				154507 converted to TA-7C.
154523/154556	Ling-Temco-Vought A-7B-4-CV Corsair II
				154536 converted to TA-7C.
				154537 converted to TA-7C.
				154544 converted to TA-7C.
156734/156740	Ling Temco Vought A-7C-1-CV Corsair II
				156737 converted to TA-7C.
				156738 converted to TA-7C, c/n C-005.  
				156740 converted to TA-7C.
156741/156761	Ling Temco Vought A-7C-2-CV Corsair II
				156741 converted to TA-7C, then to EA-7L.  
				156743 converted to TA-7C, then to EA-7L.  
				156744 converted to TA-7C.
				156745 converted to TA-7C, then to EA-7L.  
				156746 converted to TA-7C.
				156747 converted to TA-7C.
				156748 converted to TA-7C.
				156750 converted to TA-7C.
				156751 converted to TA-7C.
				156753 converted to TA-7C.
				156757 converted to TA-7C, then to EA-7L. 
				156761 converted to TA-7C, then to EA-7L. 
156762/156800	Ling Temco Vought A-7C-3-CV Corsair II
				156765 converted to TA-7C.  
				156766 converted to TA-7C.
				156767 converted to TA-7C.
				156768 converted to TA-7C.
				156770 converted to TA-7C.
				156773 converted to TA-7C.
				156774 converted to TA-7C.
				156777 converted to TA-7C.
				156779 converted to TA-7C.
				156782 converted to TA-7C.
				156784 converted to TA-7C, c/n C-051.  
				156786 converted to TA-7C, then to EA-7L.
				156787 converted to TA-7C, c/n C-054.  
				156788 converted to TA-7C.
				156789 converted to TA-7C.
				156790 converted to TA-7C.  
				156791 converted to TA-7C, later to EA-7L.  
				156793 converted to TA-7C.
				156794 converted to TA-7C.
				156795 converted to TA-7C, c/n C-062.  
				156800 converted to TA-7C.  
					

Sources:


  1. American Combat Planes, 3rd Edition, Ray Wagner, Doubleday, 1982.

  2. United States Navy Aircraft Since 1911, GordonSwanborough and Peter M. Bowers, Naval Institute Press, 1990.

  3. E-mail from Robert Manley on production blocks for A-7s

  4. E-mail from Joe Hawkins on 8 EA-7Ls being converted, not 6.