Martin Maryland

Last revised August 20, 2000


Although the Martin Model 167 was never ordered into service by the US Army, it was to serve in substantial numbers with both the French and British air arms. On January 26, 1939, the French government placed a contract for 115 aircraft. The French version was designated Model 167F by the company. The Armee de l'Air designation was 167 A-3, the A standing for Army cooperation and the -3 identifying a three-seater.

The first 167F for France flew in August 1939. The Model 167F had French equipment installed and was armed with six 7.5-mm machine guns, four in the wings, another in the dorsal turret, and one in a deeply-cut lower position behind the bomb bay. French aircraft could carry two 624-pounds or eight 116-pound bombs and six 7.5-mm machine guns, The Model 167F differed from the XA-22 in having no cover over the turret and was powered by 900-hp Wasps supercharged to 12,000 feet. The first Model 167F flew in August of 1939. The French order was increased to 215 aircraft upon the outbreak of war in September of 1939.

According to the original plan, the Model 167F aircraft were to be delivered to depots in French North Africa where they would be prepared for operational service. The first Martins did not reach French North Africa until December 15. After the German invasion of May 10, 1940, the French Martins were thrown into action. They flew 418 combat sorties from May 22 to June 24, 18 Martins being lost in action. In the meantime, deliveries on a third contract had begun. 223 Martins had arrived in Casablanca by June 15, but only 182 had been assembled and turned over to the Armee de l'Air. After the Armistice, many surviving Martins ended up with the Vichy Air Force, but several managed to escape to England.

After the Armistice of June 1940, the British government took over the last 50 Model 167s on the French order, along with 75 built under a direct RAF contract completed in July of 1940. They were named Maryland I in RAF service. Between December 1940 and April 1941, 150 Maryland IIs were delivered to the RAF with R-1830-S3C4-G Wasps which were each rated at 1000 hp at 12,500 feet.

RAF Marylands served with a general reconnaissance unit in Malta in 1940 and in 1941 with one British and three South African light-bomber squadron in northwest Africa. The Model 167s serving with the Vichy Air Force were used to attack Allied forces in Syria in June of 1941 and American forces near Casablanca in November 1942. This makes the Model 167 yet another example of an aircraft which fought on both sides in the Second World War.

Serials of RAF Marylands:

AH205/AH279		Maryland I	
AH280/AH429		Maryland II	
			Martin company number 1827/1976
			AH301/311, 313/331, 371, 373/380,386/395,
			406/426, 428, 429 renumbered in South African Air
			Force 1600/1699 allocation.   
AR702/AR751		Maryland I
			AR702/736 accepted to American standards.
			AR720, 736, 740 transferred to Fleet Air Arm
AX689			Martin 167 Maryland - presumed French escapee
AX690			Martin 167 Maryland - presumed French escapee
AX692			Martin 167 Maryland - presumed French escapee
AX693			Martin 167 Maryland - presumed French escapee
AX696 		Martin 167 Maryland - presumed French escapee
BJ421/BJ428		Maryland I - Ex-French contract.  Delivered to Middle East
			January 1941.
BS760/BS777 	Maryland I - Ex-French contract.  BS777 to Free French
			forces July 1941.  BS770 and BS777 converted
  			for target towing.

Specification of Martin Model 167 (Maryland I):

Engines: Two Pratt & Whitney R-1830-SC3G air-cooled radial engines, each rated at 1050 hp for takeoff and 900 hp at 12,000 feet. Performance: Maximum speed 275 mph at sea level, 304 mph at 13,000 feet. Cruising speed 248 mph. Landing speed 71 mph. Service ceiling 29,500 feet. Initial climb rate 2000 feet per minute. Maximum range 1300 miles. Dimensions: Wingspan 61 feet 4 inches, length 46 feet 8 inches, height 10 feet 0 inches, wing area 538.5 square feet. Weights: 10,586 pounds empty, 15,927 pounds gross, 16,571 pounds maximum. Armament: Six 7.5-mm machine guns, four in the wings, another in the dorsal turret, and one in a deeply-cut lower position behind the bomb bay. Could carry two 624-pounds or eight 116-pound bombs and six 7.5-mm machine guns, Sources: Dog of War, Peter Bowers, Airpower, Vol 26, No. 1 (1996) British Military Aircraft Serials 1912-1969, Bruce Robertson, Ian Allen, 1969. American Combat Planes, Ray Wagner, Third Enlarged Edition, Doubleday, 1982.

Sources:


  1. American Combat Planes, Third Enlarged Edition, Ray Wagner, Doubleday, 1982.

  2. Dog of War, Peter Bowers, Airpower, Vol 26, No. 1 (1996) British Military Aircraft Serials 1912-1969, Bruce Robertson, Ian Allen, 1969.

  3. British Military Aircraft Serials 1912-1969, Bruce Robertson, Ian Allen, 1969.