General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon for Singapore

Last revised September 26, 2015


In January of 1985, the government of Singapore ordered eight F-16/79 fighters and it reserved an option for 12 more. The F-16/79 was a cost-reduced version of the Fighting Falcon powered by the General Electric J79 turbojet rather than the F100 turbofan. In mid-1985, it became apparent that the F100-powered version would be made available, and Singapore changed its order to eight F-16A/B Block 15 OCU aircraft (four single-seaters and four two-seaters). This purchase was under the Peace Carvin Foreign Military Sales program, and was intended to replace the aging Hawker Hunters still serving with the Republic of Singapore Air Force.

Singapore took delivery of its first F-16 (a two seater) on February 20, 1988. They were powered by Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-220 engines and were Block 15 aircraft with strengthened block 30 airframes. Before taking their planes back home, Singapore pilots spent a couple of years at Luke AFB in Arizona working up to full operational standards. During this period, the Singapore F-16s wore USAF markings, and were marked with a red tailband and a small Singapore flag. While based at Luke AFB, Singapore also leased nine F-16As previously used by the Thunderbirds flight demonstration team.

The first F-16s did not arrive in Singapore until January 1990. They currently equip No 140 Squadron at Tengah Air Base.

Singapore had announced plans to buy eleven F-16C/Ds, then hastily withdrew its order when neighboring Malaysia secured eight F/A-18 Hornets. After assessing the capability of the Hornet, on July 9, 1994, the Minister of Defence of the government of Singapore announced that it would stick with the Fighting Falcon and would increase its order to 18 Block 52 F-16C/Ds (eight F-16Cs and 10 F-16Ds), nine of which were to be retained at Luke AFB for training. The planes were purchased under Peace Carvin II.

The F-16C/Ds in the Peace Carvin II Singapore order were of Block 52, and were powered by the Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-229 engine. The planes are provided with the Lockheed Martin Sharphooter, a downrated version of the LANTIRN pod system. All of the Singapore F-16C/Ds were to be equipped with wide-angle HUD and APG-68(V)5 radar. The Advanced Identification Friend or Foe (AIFF) system was provided, which can be distinguished by an antenna array immediately forward of the cockpit. Interestingly, some of the F-16Ds in this order were equipped with a "swollen spine" similar to that of the Israeli F-16Ds, this spine fairing providing additional avionics capacity for air to ground mission. Delivery of these planes began in the spring of 1998. They are now serving alongside the F-16A/Bs at Tengah.

Part of the Peace Carvin II contract included a commercial lease-to-buy contract with Lockheed Martin for 12 Block 42 F-16C/Ds. These planes will remain in the USA, and will will replace the nine leased USAF F-16A/Bs operating at Luke AFB, Arizona.

A new contract was placed in October 1997 for 12 Block 52D F-16C/Ds (6Cs, 6 Ds). These planes were purchased directly from the manufacturer and not through the US government FMS program (although Lockheed Martin refers to the deal as Peace Carvin III). The first of these planes were delivered on November 30, 1999. The six F-16Cs will replace the leased USAF F-16C that were used for training with the 425th FS at Luke AFB, Arizona. The leased USAF Block 40 F-16Cs will be transferred to the 162nd FW of the Arizona ANG. The six Block 52D F-16Ds will be operated by the 27th FW/428th FS at Cannon AFB, New Mexico.

Currently, Singapore is negotiating with Lockheed for the delivery of another six aircraft, to be powered by F100 engines. The leased F-16s are to be exchanged for similar Fighting Falcons of the later series. In addition, it was announced in July 2000 that Singapore intends to purcnase another 20 F-16C/Ds. This will be under Peace Carvin IV. The planes will be powered by the F-100-PW-229 turbofan, and deliveries will begin in late 2003.

In July of 2015, it was announced that the Singapore AF would upgrade 60 F-16C/D aircraft with new Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar.

Serials of Singapore F-16s:

87-0397/0398		General Dynamics F-16A Block 15AA OCU Fighting Falcon
				built for export to Singapore as 880/881
87-0399/0400		General Dynamics F-16A Block 15AB OCU Fighting Falcon
				built for export to Singapore as 882/883
87-0401			General Dynamics F-16B Block 15Z OCU Fighting Falcon
				built for export to Singapore as 884
87-0402/0403		General Dynamics F-16B Block 15AA OCU Fighting Falcon
				built for export to Singapore as 885/886
87-0404			General Dynamics F-16B Block 15AB OCU Fighting Falcon
				built for export to Singapore as 887
94-0266/0273		Lockheed F-16C Block 52 Fighting Falcon
				MSN DA-1/8.  To Singapore under Peace Carvin II as 608/615
				0268 Singapore AF 610
				0270 with 425h FS in USAF markings at Luke AFB training Singapore pilots
				0271 Singapore AF 613
				0273 with 425th FS in USAF markings at Luke AFB training Singapore pilots
94-0274/0283		Lockheed F-16D Block 52 Fighting Falcon
				MSN DB-1/10.  To Singapore under Peace Carvin II
				0274 Singapore AF 638
				0275 Singapore AF 623
				0276 Singapore AF 624
				0277 Singapore AF 625
				0278 Singapore AF 626
				0279 Singapore AF 627
				0280 Singapore AF 691
				0281 with 425th FS in USAF markings at Luke AFB training Singapore pilots
				0282 Singapore AF 629.  Noted Mar 2005 in USAF markings with
					482nd FS at Cannon AFB, presumably for training Singapore
					AF pilots.
				0283
96-5025/5028		Lockheed Martin F-16CJ Block 52 Fighting Falcon
				MSN DA-9/DA-12.  To Singapore (lease) under Peace Carvin III.   
					Believed being used in USA for training.
				5025 (DA-9) Singapore AF serial is 615
				5026 (DA-10) Singapore AF serial is 612
				5027 (56th FW, 425th FS) crashed on Barry Goldwater Range May 29, 2002.  Pilot ejected safely.
				5028 (56th FW/426th FS on behalf of Singapore AF) crashed south
					of Barry M. Goldwater Range, AZ May 19, 2004 during night
					training flight.  Pilot killed.  Cause determined to be
					pilot error (either G-LOC or spatial disorentation)
96-5029/5036		Lockheed Martin F-16DJ Block 52 Fighting Falcon
				MSN DB-11/DB-18.  To Singapore (lease under Peace Carvin III.
					Believed being used in USA for training
				5029 (DB-11) Singapore AF serial is 694
				5030 noted at Paya Lebar Airshow, Singapore Sep 6-7, 2003 in full Singapore AF livery with serial 695.
				5031 (DB-13) Singapore AF serial is 642.  Noted Mar 2005 in USAF 
					markings with 482nd FS at Cannon
					AFB, presumably for training of Singapore AF pilots.
				5032 (F-16DJ MSN DB-14) Singapore AF serial is 692.
				5033 (MSN DB-15) Singapore AF serial is 632.
				5035 F-16DJ. A photograph 'Air Forces Monthly' magazine shows this painted in USAF marks and 
					based at Luke AFB, AZ with 525th FS for training Singapore AF pilots
97-0112/0121		Lockheed Martin F-16CJ Block 52 Fighting Falcon
				MSN DA-13/DA-22.  For Singapore under Peace Carvin III.
				0112 with 425th FS in USAF markings at Luke AFB training Singapore pilots
				0113 with 425th FS in USAF markings at Luke AFB training Singapore pilots
				0114 noted Mar 2005 in USAF markings with 482nd FS at Cannon
					AFB, presumably for training of Singapore AF pilots
				0116 noted Mar 2005 in USAF markings with 482nd FS at Cannon
					AFB, presumably for training of Singapore AF pilots
				0117 noted Mar 2005 in USAF markings with 482nd FS at Cannon
					AFB, presumably for training of Singapore AF pilots
				0120 with 425th FS in USAF markings at Luke AFB training Singapore pilots
				0121 with 425th FS, 56th FW) at Luke AFB.  Not sure if it is being
					used for training of Singapore AF pilots.
97-0122/0123		Lockheed Martin F-16D Block 52 Fighting Falcon
				MSN DB-19/DB-20.  For Singapore under Peace Carvin III
				0122 Singapore AF 639
				0123 Singapore AF 640

Sources:


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  2. General Dynamics Aircraft and their Predecessors, John Wegg, Naval Institute Press, 1990.

  3. The American Fighter, Enzo Angelucci and Peter Bowers, Orion, 1987.

  4. United States Military Aircraft Since 1909, Gordon Swanborough and Peter M. Bowers, Smithsonian, 1989.

  5. F-16 Fighting Falcon--A Major Review of the West's Universal Warplane, Robert F. Dorr, World Airpower Journal, Spring 1991.

  6. The World's Great Interceptor Aircraft, Gallery, 1989.

  7. Modern Military Aircraft--F-16 Viper, Lou Drendel, Squadron/Signal Publications, 1992.

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  9. Airscene Headlines, Air International,

  10. Military Aviation Review, World Airpower Journal, Volume 22, 1995

  11. Military Aviation Review, World Airpower Journal, Volume 33, 1998

  12. Military Aviation Review, World Airpower Journal, Volume 34, 1998

  13. Lockheed Martin F-16 Operators, Part 2, Peter R. Foster, World Airpower Journal, Vol 24, Spring 1996.

  14. ASEAN Air Power, Robert Hewson, Air Forces Monthly, March 2000.

  15. Air Forces Monthly, May 2000